PFS Review – Good Kill

Good Kill

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Don Malvasi

Originally posted on Cinedork.com

Click here for the full Roxy listing and times.

Click image for the full Roxy listings and times.

Tommy Egan (Ethan Hawke) suffers from a new kind of culture shock. An F-16 military pilot with six Iraqi tours under his belt, he now finds himself inside a claustrophobic trailer that serves as a drone command center near Las Vegas. Major Egan, surrounded by newcomers recruited because they “were a bunch of gamers,” has also become an increasingly rare breed of specialist–one with actual combat experience. The triggerman for numerous drone strikes in Afghanistan and Yemen, he pines to get back in the cockpit of an jet airplane–a place where the fight is at least fair. In a plane he felt an oddly intoxicating fear. Here he feels revulsion and self-loathing.

Now Showing – Week of May 18th

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Written by Trey Shields on . Posted in Blogs

We are entering the home stretch of our first ever Film at the Roxy series this week. With only two weeks to go, we have just a handful of films left, including Passport to World Cinema’s Phoenix (2015). Thank you for all those who have made it out to the Roxy to support such an ambitious series. New program guides will begin distribution in the coming week for our Film at the Roxy June/July series. I think this one is even better than the first (I’m not just saying that!). We are going to present a lot more challenging and exciting films that intend to enrich our film culture in the city. Please send me any feedback about your experience with Film at the Roxy and be sure to continue to support the programming so that we can continue this excellent programming.

PFS at the Maryland Film Festival – Day 2

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Written by Trey Shields on . Posted in Blogs

Whether it was for logistical reasons or MFF simply wanted to allow some time for all the patrons of the festival to recover from the party the night before, films didn’t begin screening until the later afternoon. I spent the morning exploring the surrounds Station North area where a majority of the festival is centered around. It is an exciting, diverse neighborhood with a number of new local businesses opening up. The Red Emma’s is a perfect spot to escape the blaring sun and dine on some delicious food while reading anarchist literature.

PFS at the Maryland Film Festival – Day 1

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Written by Trey Shields on . Posted in Blogs

In the week leading up to the Maryland Film Festival, the city of Baltimore faced an alleged police brutality incident and the ensuing protests that followed. It left the city shaken and the national media rife with violent, often-accused biased, footage of “a city in flames”. It was disheartening to see so much attention placed on the ensuing riots and not the incident that was the catalyst for it all.

Last Week on Tuesday – May 12th, 2015

lastweektuesday

Written by Trey Shields on . Posted in Blogs

Last week was completely packed with special events going on at the Philadelphia Film Society. I got to take (my first ever) business trip down to Baltimore for the Maryland Film Festival. I’ll be posting a recap and highlights from my time down there later this week. I’ll just say that MFF was a very powerful and extraordinary film festival that really displayed the importance and love of film in such a supportive community.

Last Week on Tuesday – April 28th

Written by Trey Shields on . Posted in Blogs

I’m happy to introduce another new blog section called “Last Week on Tuesday”. Every Tuesday I’ll fill you in on what happened the previous week at PFS,  all the blood, sweat, tears and sneak previews. Last week saw a number of screenings and events for PFS. From weeding a section of Fairmount Park to literally being in the weeds with a certain screening (jokes, jokes), we saw it all.

Now Showing at PFS – Week of April 27th

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Written by Trey Shields on . Posted in Blogs, Uncategorized

Welcome and thank you for reading the first, of hopefully many installments, of Monday’s “Now Showing” blog post. This will be your guide for all things film/movie/experimental GIFs revolving around the Philadelphia Film Society and beyond. My goal is to not only sate your never ending thirst for irreverent click baiting blog posts, but inform you of all the exciting things happening in the coming week. Click here for a full list of this week’s showings.

…but let’s be honest, there is only one thing on peoples’ minds this week:

PFS Review – The Age of Adaline

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs, Uncategorized

By Alex Gibson

The Age of Adaline opens with snow falling in San Francisco in the early 1900s, a momentous occasion considering the climate of the area, but also remarkable because of what happens to 29-year-old Adaline Bowman See it at the Roxy!just minutes later.

On her way to see her young daughter, Adaline skids off the road and from then on, never ages another day. Played exquisitely by Blake Lively, Adaline lives her life one the run decade after decade without aging a single day until the 2010s, when she meets Ellis Jones (Michiel Huisman), the first man to whom she’d consider revealing her secret.  The Age of Adaline co-stars Ellen Bursytn, who plays Adaline’s daughter Flemming, and Harrison Ford, the former love of her life, who catches up with her years later.  

PFS Review – American Sniper

American Sniper

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Don Malvasi

Originally Posted on Cinedork.com

Far from an exercise in yahoo-ism, American Sniper offers us a film startlingly immediate in itsSee it at the Roxy! action scenes. Coming to be known as “The Legend,” Navy Seal Chris Kyle, its subject, went through four tours in the Iraq War, in which he performed around 160 official “kills” (and apparently another hundred unofficial ones). The film does an adequate if not equally proficient job of showing the tally all the warfare takes on his psyche. Like Kyle, director Clint Eastwood seems eager to get back to Iraq. In between the tours, domestic scenes with his wife (Sienna Miller) show an increasingly distant Kyle. More detail could have been presented but his emotional and mental deterioration come across nonetheless. Although Kyle approached his mission with an unwavering patriotism, Kyle viewed himself much differently than his peers viewed him.