Now Showing at PFS – Week of April 27th

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Written by Trey Shields on . Posted in Blogs, Uncategorized

Welcome and thank you for reading the first, of hopefully many installments, of Monday’s “Now Showing” blog post. This will be your guide for all things film/movie/experimental GIFs revolving around the Philadelphia Film Society and beyond. My goal is to not only sate your never ending thirst for irreverent click baiting blog posts, but inform you of all the exciting things happening in the coming week. Click here for a full list of this week’s showings.

…but let’s be honest, there is only one thing on peoples’ minds this week:

PFS Review – The Age of Adaline

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs, Uncategorized

By Alex Gibson

The Age of Adaline opens with snow falling in San Francisco in the early 1900s, a momentous occasion considering the climate of the area, but also remarkable because of what happens to 29-year-old Adaline Bowman See it at the Roxy!just minutes later.

On her way to see her young daughter, Adaline skids off the road and from then on, never ages another day. Played exquisitely by Blake Lively, Adaline lives her life one the run decade after decade without aging a single day until the 2010s, when she meets Ellis Jones (Michiel Huisman), the first man to whom she’d consider revealing her secret.  The Age of Adaline co-stars Ellen Bursytn, who plays Adaline’s daughter Flemming, and Harrison Ford, the former love of her life, who catches up with her years later.  

PFS Interview – Rupert Wyatt, Director of The Gambler

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Uncategorized

By Alex Gibson

In one of the many memorable scenes of The Gambler, Jim Bennett (Mark Wahlberg) weaves through a lecture hall See it at the Roxy!lamenting the absence of genius in the world. He teaches his students that genius is born, not bred, and those who don’t have it shouldn’t even try. Though he does not call himself a genius, he will come to admit that three of his students are: the nationally ranked tennis-player Dexter (Emory Cohen), the school’s all-star basketball player (Anthony Kelley), and a shy young writer (Brie Larson). By the end of the film, these three will also be the only people who see Jim in both halves of his life, the only ones who see both sides of the coin, or in his case, the casino chip.

A loose remake of the 1974 film of the same name, The Gambler stars Mark Wahlberg as  Jim, an English professor who racks up over $260,000 worth of debt and is given seven days to repay it. Jim owes the bulk of his money to a Korean gangster Mister Lee (Alvin Ing) and Neville, a genial moneylender (Michael Kenneth Williams). After receiving and gambling away a payout from his mother (Jessica Lange), Jim later goes to Frank, played hauntingly by John Goodman, for another loan. While it seems that The Gambler centers around gambling addiction as the original film did, this version focuses more on a character who wants to get away from his life and finds an escape in casinos.

Earlier this month, The Gambler director Rupert Wyatt visited Philadelphia for a special screening of the film. The next day, I got the opportunity to discuss his film with him.

#TBT – Flashback to PFF21 – EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH M. NIGHT SHYAMALAN

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs, Uncategorized

By Ben Silverio

During the 21st Philadelphia Film Festival, we celebrated the 10-year anniversary of M. Night Shyamalan’s ‘Signs’ at the Prince Theater with a Q&A with the director and WMMR’s ‘Preston & Steve’ morning show host/movie buff Steve Morrison after the film. Here are some pictures from the event to relive the great time had by all attended:

The Essentials 2.0 – Killer Joe

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Uncategorized

By John Smith

William Friedkin has become one of the most influential and important film makers in the business with a career that spans over 40 years. Some of his best known works are The French Connection from 1971, The Exorcist from 1973, and his extremely controversial Cruising from 1980. In 2011, and well into his seventies, William Friedkin along with playwright Tracy Letts created a devastatingly brutal film that succeeds in terms of writing and directing. It may not be any textbooks yet, but in this writer’s opinion, it is one of the better movies of the last decade.

Philadelphia International Children’s Film Festival

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Uncategorized

This past weekend, the Philadelphia Film Society, in partnership with the New York International Children’s Film Festival, presented the Philadelphia International Children’s Film Festival (June 6-8).  Our little film-goers enjoyed healthy snacks from the Whole Foods Pop-Up Concessions Stand, engaging activities from Parent to Child Therapy Associates and the 10 Day Film Challenge, and of course renowned international children’s films.