PFS Interview – Rupert Wyatt, Director of The Gambler

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Uncategorized

By Alex Gibson

In one of the many memorable scenes of The Gambler, Jim Bennett (Mark Wahlberg) weaves through a lecture hall See it at the Roxy!lamenting the absence of genius in the world. He teaches his students that genius is born, not bred, and those who don’t have it shouldn’t even try. Though he does not call himself a genius, he will come to admit that three of his students are: the nationally ranked tennis-player Dexter (Emory Cohen), the school’s all-star basketball player (Anthony Kelley), and a shy young writer (Brie Larson). By the end of the film, these three will also be the only people who see Jim in both halves of his life, the only ones who see both sides of the coin, or in his case, the casino chip.

A loose remake of the 1974 film of the same name, The Gambler stars Mark Wahlberg as about Jim, an English professor who racks up over $260,000 worth of debt and is given seven days to repay it. Jim owes the bulk of his money to a Korean gangster Mister Lee (Alvin Ing) and Neville, a genial moneylender (Michael Kenneth Williams). After receiving and gambling away a payout from his mother (Jessica Lange), Jim later goes to Frank, played hauntingly by John Goodman, for another loan. While it seems that The Gambler centers around gambling addict as the original film did, this version focuses more on a character who wants to get away from his life and finds an escape in casinos.

Earlier this month, The Gambler director Rupert Wyatt visited Philadelphia for a special screening of the film. The next day, I got the opportunity to discuss his film with him.

#TBT – Flashback to PFF21 – EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH M. NIGHT SHYAMALAN

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs, Uncategorized

By Ben Silverio

During the 21st Philadelphia Film Festival, we celebrated the 10-year anniversary of M. Night Shyamalan’s ‘Signs’ at the Prince Theater with a Q&A with the director and WMMR’s ‘Preston & Steve’ morning show host/movie buff Steve Morrison after the film. Here are some pictures from the event to relive the great time had by all attended:

The Essentials 2.0 – Killer Joe

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Uncategorized

By John Smith

William Friedkin has become one of the most influential and important film makers in the business with a career that spans over 40 years. Some of his best known works are The French Connection from 1971, The Exorcist from 1973, and his extremely controversial Cruising from 1980. In 2011, and well into his seventies, William Friedkin along with playwright Tracy Letts created a devastatingly brutal film that succeeds in terms of writing and directing. It may not be any textbooks yet, but in this writer’s opinion, it is one of the better movies of the last decade.

Philadelphia International Children’s Film Festival

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Uncategorized

This past weekend, the Philadelphia Film Society, in partnership with the New York International Children’s Film Festival, presented the Philadelphia International Children’s Film Festival (June 6-8).  Our little film-goers enjoyed healthy snacks from the Whole Foods Pop-Up Concessions Stand, engaging activities from Parent to Child Therapy Associates and the 10 Day Film Challenge, and of course renowned international children’s films.

PHILADELPHIA FILM SOCIETY LAUNCHES MIDNIGHT CULT FAVORITE AND GENRE FILM SERIES, THE GRAVEYARD SHIFT

Written by Parinda on . Posted in Press, Uncategorized

PHILADELPHIA FILM SOCIETY LAUNCHES MIDNIGHT CULT FAVORITE AND GENRE FILM SERIES, THE GRAVEYARD SHIFT

 THE SERIES OPENS WITH DARIO ARGENTO’S ITALIAN CULT CLASSIC, SUSPIRIA ON FRIDAY, MAY 9, 2014

(Monday, May 5, 2014 – Philadelphia, PA) – The Philadelphia Film Society is excited to announce the full lineup of The Graveyard Shift, a monthly midnight showcase expanded from a category of the Philadelphia Film Festival. The series will host cult favorite and new genre films for fans of horror, action, suspense, thriller and the downright weird.

The first leg of the series was launched in early-April during the PFF: Spring Showcase, presented by PFS, and included two nights of late night genre films.

Kicking off with director Alex de la Iglesia’s Witching and Bitching, the Spanish horror comedy focused on a set of bumbling bankrobbers that get more than they bargained for when their high speed getaway leads them into a small village where a blood-thirsty coven of witches is preparing for an ancient ritual.

The following night featured acclaimed Korean director Kim Ki-Duk’sMoebius, one of the most daring pieces of modern cinema, the film displays a shocking, provocative, grotesque, unpredictable meditation of family, monogamy, and Buddhism in this genre classic in the making.

“The Graveyard Shift has always been an anticipated section of our annual film festival,” said Allison Koehler, Education and Programs Director for the Philadelphia Film Society.  “The year-round expansion program is going to be really fun, unique, and a little whimsical.  It’s a distinct take on the midnight series, including international cult classics on 35mm and exciting new genre work coming straight out of the festival circuit.”

Further Watching – Films for your next movie night

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Uncategorized

By Megan Reilly

With more than a century’s worth of films to pore over, choosing a movie to watch can be a daunting task. I can’t count the number of times that I’ve carved out two hours to devote to expanding my cinematic horizons, only to resort to an old favorite after scrolling through endless Netflix recommendations and Amazon genre categories. Here’s a more targeted approach: if you enjoyed the following 2013 releases, check out the corresponding suggestions for a fresh take on a similar story, tone, or style.