Posts Tagged ‘Filmadelphia’

Now Showing – Week of May 18th

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Written by Trey Shields on . Posted in Blogs

We are entering the home stretch of our first ever Film at the Roxy series this week. With only two weeks to go, we have just a handful of films left, including Passport to World Cinema’s Phoenix (2015). Thank you for all those who have made it out to the Roxy to support such an ambitious series. New program guides will begin distribution in the coming week for our Film at the Roxy June/July series. I think this one is even better than the first (I’m not just saying that!). We are going to present a lot more challenging and exciting films that intend to enrich our film culture in the city. Please send me any feedback about your experience with Film at the Roxy and be sure to continue to support the programming so that we can continue this excellent programming.

PFS at the Maryland Film Festival – Day 2

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Written by Trey Shields on . Posted in Blogs

Whether it was for logistical reasons or MFF simply wanted to allow some time for all the patrons of the festival to recover from the party the night before, films didn’t begin screening until the later afternoon. I spent the morning exploring the surrounds Station North area where a majority of the festival is centered around. It is an exciting, diverse neighborhood with a number of new local businesses opening up. The Red Emma’s is a perfect spot to escape the blaring sun and dine on some delicious food while reading anarchist literature.

Last Week on Tuesday – April 28th

Written by Trey Shields on . Posted in Blogs

I’m happy to introduce another new blog section called “Last Week on Tuesday”. Every Tuesday I’ll fill you in on what happened the previous week at PFS,  all the blood, sweat, tears and sneak previews. Last week saw a number of screenings and events for PFS. From weeding a section of Fairmount Park to literally being in the weeds with a certain screening (jokes, jokes), we saw it all.

A Night at the Roxy – TBT Edition – 3801 Lancaster

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Alex Gibson

For this week’s PFS Blog Throwback Thursday, let’s rewind to May’s Filmadelphia Showcase, featuring 3801 Lancaster with director David Altrogge and producer Jennifer Thompson in attendance.  The film is a documentary about the trial of Dr. Kermit Gosnell, who performed grisly late-term abortions for women in Philadelphia.  For his actions, Gosnell was sentenced to life in prison last year. 

A Night at the Roxy // Filmadelphia’s Past Present Future

Past Present Future director Andrew Gitomer and Director of Photography Jonathan Stromberg at April's Filmadelphia at the Roxy screening.

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Davis Rivera

Andrew Gitomer’s Past Present Future is a feature-length film about two close friends who had had an on-again, off-again relationship since high school, and meet up for the first time after three years apart.  The film is structured so that the audience is able to see the course of their friendship play out in flashbacks while they confront their complicated past.  Writer/Director Gitomer’s decision not to edit the film in chronological order was a conscious one that gives the film an emotional power that should resonate with anyone who has ever been in or been a witness to a similar situation.  Indeed, the film itself is one of the best portraits of young people in modern America that has come along in quite some time.  When I spoke to Gitomer and his Director of Photography Jonathan Stromberg after the film, Gitomer described his desire to push the youth angle when promoting the film.

A Night at the Roxy – Filmadelphia // The Backyard Philly Project

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

Last month, the PFS Theater at the Roxy hosted Amanda Danziger’s The Backyard Philly Project for it’s monthly Filmadelphia at the Roxy series.

The Backyard Philly Project explores the lives of four teens growing up in the Philadelphia inner-city neighborhood known as Penn Town.  Shot partially by the teens themselves, this documentary give an insightful look at life amidst city housing unites where scenes of violence, poverty, friendship, and inspiration are edited together.  Including a spotlight on the Helping Hands Rescue Mission, the films reveals the necessity of support encouragement, and a positive environment for young people in the city.  The film was inspired by former Kixx player Adam Bruckner, now a Philadelphia resident and after school program director.

During the Q&A session after the film, Danziger told us a bit about the inspiration, the process, and the future of the Backyard Philly Project.

Local filmmakers showcased in February’s Filmadelphia at the Roxy Series

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Avery Maehrer

Joe Lee was horrified to make the call.

An idea had sprung in his head for a documentary about Sue and Ron Witman, whose family made headlines after their son was found guilty of brutally killing his younger brother. But for Lee’s vision to come to fruition, he had to pick up the phone and convince the married couple to tell him their story. After Lee overcame his nerves and reached out to the Witmans, they met in person. The rest is history.

“They kind of fell in love with us,” Lee said. “And we fell in love with them.”

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The result of what followed Lee’s phone call is “The Witmans” – one of three short films by local filmmakers showcased on Feb. 18 in the

Philadelphia Film Society’s Filmadelphia at the Roxy program. In addition to Lee’s work, Doris ChiaChing Lin’s “Maquette 1:1000” and Hilary Brashear’s “Triptych” were also screened in front of a packed theater.

So Bad It’s Good – This Means War

This Means War

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Alexander Goodlive

Imagine that two secret agents coincidentally fall in love with the same, down-home blonde-haired Reese Witherspoon… Just imagine that. Now let’s imagine that these two secret agents are actually James T. Kirk and Bane in a series of one-upping Bash Brothers mayhem. Witherspoon meets Tom Hardy on an online date, while Chris Pine heaps a massive dose of Casanova fail on her, though she is slowly charmed by his loveable narcissism. Oh, and Chelsea Handler is the best friend, obliging her duties by giving exposition to the NSA-style setup the agents arranged in order to learn everything about the girl.

Doesn’t that sound awesome?

Oh, it is, but not for the reasons it intended to be.