Posts Tagged ‘John Smith’

The Essentials 2.0 – Killer Joe

killer-joe-poster-neil-cook

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Uncategorized

By John Smith

William Friedkin has become one of the most influential and important film makers in the business with a career that spans over 40 years. Some of his best known works are The French Connection from 1971, The Exorcist from 1973, and his extremely controversial Cruising from 1980. In 2011, and well into his seventies, William Friedkin along with playwright Tracy Letts created a devastatingly brutal film that succeeds in terms of writing and directing. It may not be any textbooks yet, but in this writer’s opinion, it is one of the better movies of the last decade.

The Essentials 2.0 – Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior

The Road Warrior

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By John Smith

I feel a sense of joy when I hear that a filmmaker who was not born into the industry was able to churn out one of the most influential films of the past 50 years.  This man is George Miller who, after a successful career as a doctor, created the Mad Max trilogy. While the trilogy isn’t exactly perfect, it’s pretty safe to say that Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior is one of the closest things to action movie perfection that you can find. It also produced some of the most iconic villains to grace the genre of science fiction.

The Essentials 2.0 – Hard Boiled

Hard Boiled

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By John Smith

Action films may not be the most respected genre when it comes to film buffs. There are a lot of people that I know personally who believe that they exist solely for dumb, popcorn entertainment purposes. If that’s the case, how do you explain John Woo’s ultimate masterpiece, Hard Boiled? This film is iconic and funny, brutally stylistic and engagingly beautiful. It’s an action film that can also be considered a work of art.

And You Call Yourself a Film Buff?! – The Wild Bunch

The Wild Bunch

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By John Smith

The year is 1913. A small town in Texas is alive with music, children laughing, and a Temperance Union parade. Life is simply happening, but soon death and destruction invades the town and symphony of pain and gunfire erupts. This sudden contrast of mood and the unflinching, unapologetic violence makes for one of the most intense and memorable introductions in film history. It also sets the tone for Sam Peckinpah’s brutal anti-Western, The Wild Bunch.

So Bad It’s Good – Mutant Girls Squad

Mutant Girls Squad

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By John Smith

Guilty pleasures are a necessary recourse for any cinephile, no matter what genre or style you gravitate towards. My poison comes in the form of the over-the-top, blood splattering films of the Sushi Typhoon production company. These films barely classify as B-movies, and one of my personal favorites is Mutant Girls Squad. This film is vulgar and has pretty poor production value, but I can’t help but enjoy it just for the pure madness that it has to offer.

And You Call Yourself a Film Buff?! – Videodrome

Videodrome Image

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By John Smith

Videodrome. How can a title as mysterious as that not get you curious as to what this movie is about. I’m not here to talk about the title, of course. I’m here to talk about the movie behind that title. David Cronenberg is a name that resonates throughout modern film with movies like Scanners, The Fly, and Eastern Promises. This 1983 film, however, is what has stood the test of time and has quite possibly become even more relevant in this modern day and age. This is Videodrome.