Posts Tagged ‘PFS Blog’

PFS Review – The Hateful Eight

The Hateful Eight

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Don Malvasi

Originally Published on Cinedork.com

Sadly, we cannot undo the unconscionable acts propelled by racism and sexism throughout our history. A large part of fixing these See it at the Roxy! copyproblems is coming to grips with what actually occurred. Viscerally experiencing the shameful humiliations is a good start. In The Hateful Eight, Quentin Tarantino, never one to shy away from harsh realities, holds a mirror to some of the crassest and most unmerciful forms of denial of human dignity.

Draping his hate-filled, postbellum tale around a classic Western genre, Tarantino intensifies the proceedings with glorious Super Panavision 70mm cinematography and a score from spaghetti western veteran Ennio Morricone. The Hateful Eight is meant to be seen on the widest screen possible. Ironically, much of the film takes place in one room, Minnie’s Haberdashery, a roadside rest stop set amidst a Wyoming blizzard.

PFS Review: The Big Short

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Don Malvasi

Originally posted on Cinedork.comSee it at the Roxy! copy

Like all superb art about significant political events, The Big Short holds a mirror to human beings caught up in forces beyond their control. Highly entertaining and often comical, the film focuses on several maverick financial rocket scientists who go against the grain, trying to take the upper hand in the way they know best. Betting that the economy will collapse long before the rest of their contemporaries catch on, the geniuses here may be wacko eccentric in completely different ways, but they know how to make money.

Michael Burry (Christian Bale), the most extreme of the bunch, appears to be rather far along the Asperger spectrum. He’s also in charge of investments for a California investment firm. He often works barefoot listening to death metal, and doesn’t pay much attention to his staff. His initial investigation of the mortgage housing bubble convinces him he must bet against what had been assumed to be a rock solid bonds contrived from subprime mortgages. The idea was so foreign at the time that Burry must go to the investment banks and ask them to create a new financial entity–in essence, bond insurance.

PFS Review – Amy

FILE - In this Feb. 16, 2007 file photo, British singer Amy Winehouse poses for photographs after being interviewed by The Associated Press at a studio in north London. Amy Winehouse, the beehived soul-jazz diva whose self-destructive habits overshadowed a distinctive musical talent, was found dead Saturday in her London home, police said. She was 27. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs, Uncategorized

By Don Malvasi

Originally posted on Cinedork.com

Director Asif Kapadia took what was the blessing of Amy Winehouse’s family and record company and then relentlessly actually made the film that needed to be made on the life of Amy Winehouse. His biopic wisely throws out any political correctness and eschews a safe approach for an ultimately honest one. The results offer a movie that is hands-down among the year’s best. A film as tough to sit through as 12 Years A Slave, Amy could go down as the quintessential tragic rendering of the abhorrent cost of fame in this unforgiving age. At once monstrous and life-affirming, Amy is the rare film that elicits many an excruciating reaction while also rendering an odd catharsis. Winehouse here on one level is the indomitable beacon of a pop star. Except for her amazing voice and songwriting, she seems just like you and me in so many ways, yet is ultimately destined for tragedy.

PFS Review – Clouds of Sils Maria

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Don Malvasi

Originally posted on Cinedork.com

See it at the Roxy! copy

Clouds of Sils Maria contains an acting clinic and so much more. French director Olivier Assayas (Summer Hours, Carlos, Irma Vep, Demonlover) takes many chances with his solid, often wondrous, occasionally mystifying material. The viewer needs to do some work here but the rewards are plentiful. His screenplay is straightforward enough but teasingly opaque like the snake-like cloud formations he photographs so well in Sils Maria, a beautiful region in the Swiss Alps. The cloud formation portends bad weather, and it’s symbolism hangs in the rare mountain air with ravening doom.

PFS Review – Good Kill

Good Kill

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Don Malvasi

Originally posted on Cinedork.com

Click here for the full Roxy listing and times.

Click image for the full Roxy listings and times.

Tommy Egan (Ethan Hawke) suffers from a new kind of culture shock. An F-16 military pilot with six Iraqi tours under his belt, he now finds himself inside a claustrophobic trailer that serves as a drone command center near Las Vegas. Major Egan, surrounded by newcomers recruited because they “were a bunch of gamers,” has also become an increasingly rare breed of specialist–one with actual combat experience. The triggerman for numerous drone strikes in Afghanistan and Yemen, he pines to get back in the cockpit of an jet airplane–a place where the fight is at least fair. In a plane he felt an oddly intoxicating fear. Here he feels revulsion and self-loathing.

Now Showing at PFS – Week of April 27th

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Written by Trey Shields on . Posted in Blogs, Uncategorized

Welcome and thank you for reading the first, of hopefully many installments, of Monday’s “Now Showing” blog post. This will be your guide for all things film/movie/experimental GIFs revolving around the Philadelphia Film Society and beyond. My goal is to not only sate your never ending thirst for irreverent click baiting blog posts, but inform you of all the exciting things happening in the coming week. Click here for a full list of this week’s showings.

…but let’s be honest, there is only one thing on peoples’ minds this week:

PFS Interview – Rupert Wyatt, Director of The Gambler

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Uncategorized

By Alex Gibson

In one of the many memorable scenes of The Gambler, Jim Bennett (Mark Wahlberg) weaves through a lecture hall See it at the Roxy!lamenting the absence of genius in the world. He teaches his students that genius is born, not bred, and those who don’t have it shouldn’t even try. Though he does not call himself a genius, he will come to admit that three of his students are: the nationally ranked tennis-player Dexter (Emory Cohen), the school’s all-star basketball player (Anthony Kelley), and a shy young writer (Brie Larson). By the end of the film, these three will also be the only people who see Jim in both halves of his life, the only ones who see both sides of the coin, or in his case, the casino chip.

A loose remake of the 1974 film of the same name, The Gambler stars Mark Wahlberg as  Jim, an English professor who racks up over $260,000 worth of debt and is given seven days to repay it. Jim owes the bulk of his money to a Korean gangster Mister Lee (Alvin Ing) and Neville, a genial moneylender (Michael Kenneth Williams). After receiving and gambling away a payout from his mother (Jessica Lange), Jim later goes to Frank, played hauntingly by John Goodman, for another loan. While it seems that The Gambler centers around gambling addiction as the original film did, this version focuses more on a character who wants to get away from his life and finds an escape in casinos.

Earlier this month, The Gambler director Rupert Wyatt visited Philadelphia for a special screening of the film. The next day, I got the opportunity to discuss his film with him.

PFS Rapid Recommendation – The Homesman

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Davis Rivera

Taking place in the Nebraska Territory during the mid-19th century, Tommy Lee Jones‘ sophomore film The Homesman is relentless in its depiction of the formidable bleakness possessing the land our two main characters (Jones and Hilary Swank) must travel through to reach their destination.  Equally formidable is the performance from Swank, bringing life to a wonderfully complex character full of inner torment as crushing as the countryside that surrounds her.

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