Posts Tagged ‘PFS Blog’

Now Showing at PFS – Week of April 27th

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Written by Trey Shields on . Posted in Blogs, Uncategorized

Welcome and thank you for reading the first, of hopefully many installments, of Monday’s “Now Showing” blog post. This will be your guide for all things film/movie/experimental GIFs revolving around the Philadelphia Film Society and beyond. My goal is to not only sate your never ending thirst for irreverent click baiting blog posts, but inform you of all the exciting things happening in the coming week. Click here for a full list of this week’s showings.

…but let’s be honest, there is only one thing on peoples’ minds this week:

PFS Interview – Rupert Wyatt, Director of The Gambler

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Uncategorized

By Alex Gibson

In one of the many memorable scenes of The Gambler, Jim Bennett (Mark Wahlberg) weaves through a lecture hall See it at the Roxy!lamenting the absence of genius in the world. He teaches his students that genius is born, not bred, and those who don’t have it shouldn’t even try. Though he does not call himself a genius, he will come to admit that three of his students are: the nationally ranked tennis-player Dexter (Emory Cohen), the school’s all-star basketball player (Anthony Kelley), and a shy young writer (Brie Larson). By the end of the film, these three will also be the only people who see Jim in both halves of his life, the only ones who see both sides of the coin, or in his case, the casino chip.

A loose remake of the 1974 film of the same name, The Gambler stars Mark Wahlberg as  Jim, an English professor who racks up over $260,000 worth of debt and is given seven days to repay it. Jim owes the bulk of his money to a Korean gangster Mister Lee (Alvin Ing) and Neville, a genial moneylender (Michael Kenneth Williams). After receiving and gambling away a payout from his mother (Jessica Lange), Jim later goes to Frank, played hauntingly by John Goodman, for another loan. While it seems that The Gambler centers around gambling addiction as the original film did, this version focuses more on a character who wants to get away from his life and finds an escape in casinos.

Earlier this month, The Gambler director Rupert Wyatt visited Philadelphia for a special screening of the film. The next day, I got the opportunity to discuss his film with him.

PFS Rapid Recommendation – The Homesman

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Davis Rivera

Taking place in the Nebraska Territory during the mid-19th century, Tommy Lee Jones‘ sophomore film The Homesman is relentless in its depiction of the formidable bleakness possessing the land our two main characters (Jones and Hilary Swank) must travel through to reach their destination.  Equally formidable is the performance from Swank, bringing life to a wonderfully complex character full of inner torment as crushing as the countryside that surrounds her.

PFS Rapid Recommendation – Boyhood

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Davis Rivera

As a native Texan and a fan of great cinema, I had every reason to look forward to Richard Linklater’s twelve-years-in-the-making Boyhood, his portrait of a child maturing from age six to age eighteen.  What I did not anticipate was Linklater proving himself the 21st century’s master of the bildungsroman, on par with Henry Fielding and James Joyce before him.  His achievement is unparalleled and sets the new benchmark for what is possible in the world of narrative cinema.

PFS Interviews – The Cast & Crew Of Left Behind

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Alex Gibson

Imagine this:

After a long week of work, you relax for the ideal weekend with your friends and family. It’s a beautiful day, perfect for the beach during the day followed by a night on the town. Then, suddenly, in the blink of an eye, half of the people around you disappear into thin air. In fact, half the world’s population vanishes instantly.

This is the premise of Left Behind, starring Nicolas Cage and directed by Vic Armstrong. Left Behind, produced by Stony Lake Entertainment, is based on the best-selling series of the same name. The film depicts the first few hours after the Rapture, a biblical prophecy that says millions of people will ascend to Heaven instantly to save them from the darkest time in human history.

Left Behind follows Rayford Steele (Cage), an airline pilot who is flying from New York to London when a portion of his passengers – including his co-pilot – disappear. Chaos ensues as the remaining passengers wonder what happened to their friends and family, while cut off from the rest of the world. As he tries to get the plane safely on the ground, Rayford is assisted by a flirty flight attendant, Hattie (Nicky Whelan), and hardened investigative journalist Buck Williams (Chad Michael Murray).

PFS Rapid Recommendation – Lucy

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Muhammad Naqvi 

Afflicted by the paradoxical gift of losing humanity in order to help it, Scarlett Johansson falls into the part of Lucy in the Luc Besson‘s 2014 release of the same name. Morgan Freeman and Amr Waked also star in this campy and sporadically thrilling actioner. Although it seems like the Besson’s work is slipping when Lucy reaches unfathomable cognitive capabilities, it’s fun to see him juggle larger philosophical ideas within the conventional tropes of Hollywood.

#TBT – Flashback to PFF21 – EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH M. NIGHT SHYAMALAN

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs, Uncategorized

By Ben Silverio

During the 21st Philadelphia Film Festival, we celebrated the 10-year anniversary of M. Night Shyamalan’s ‘Signs’ at the Prince Theater with a Q&A with the director and WMMR’s ‘Preston & Steve’ morning show host/movie buff Steve Morrison after the film. Here are some pictures from the event to relive the great time had by all attended:

The Essentials 2.0 – Last Tango in Paris

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Davis Rivera

Making canonical lists of important works is an activity that is necessary to parse the history of art in search of a concise collection of digestible accomplishments.  Like editing a film or book, exclusion becomes key to unveiling the incomparable, autonomous forms which the artist was able to invent.  What characterizes the filmography of Marlon Brando, however, is its inability to be whittled down.  Rather than recommending his entire body of work, which should be viewed at some point, there must be an entry point and that lies within the 129 minutes of Bernardo Bertolucci‘s 1972 film Last Tango in Paris.