Posts Tagged ‘PFS Blog’

The Essentials 2.0 – Killer Joe

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Uncategorized

By John Smith

William Friedkin has become one of the most influential and important film makers in the business with a career that spans over 40 years. Some of his best known works are The French Connection from 1971, The Exorcist from 1973, and his extremely controversial Cruising from 1980. In 2011, and well into his seventies, William Friedkin along with playwright Tracy Letts created a devastatingly brutal film that succeeds in terms of writing and directing. It may not be any textbooks yet, but in this writer’s opinion, it is one of the better movies of the last decade.

PFS Rapid Recommendations – Venus in Fur

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Davis Rivera

In his latest film Venus in Fur, Roman Polanski plunges to the depths of sensual delights and returns with a pearl of a psychodrama, as elegant as it is perverse.  After a sublime opening tracking shot, Polanski never loses this momentum as he revels in the limitations of a two-person play and uses his virtuosic cinematic gifts to create a refreshingly new take on well-worn themes such as the artistic struggle, sexual dominance, and gender roles.

And You Call Yourself a Film Buff?! – The Godfather

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Megan Reilly

It’s a strange feeling, to approach a canonical film equipped with a pseudo-knowledge of its meaning as informed by parodies and quotes detached from context. I waited twenty-two years to watch a film that ends up near the top of most “Best Films of All Time” lists, so I had to filter my appreciation of Francis Ford Coppola’s 1972 magnum opus The Godfather through a host of cultural references. I turned it on knowing Tony Montana and Tony Soprano, but not their forebear, Michael Corleone. As I watched Don Corleone’s iconic conversation with Bonasera at the beginning of the film, visual cues from the referential opening of the Coen brothers’ Miller’s Crossing popped off the screen, distracting from the scene’s essential power. I couldn’t block out the sound of Dom DeLuise’s gauze-mouthed impersonation of Don Corleone in Mel Brooks’ Robin Hood: Men in Tights, so Marlon Brando’s Oscar-winning turn as the original Godfather was lost on me, a victim to parody.

The Essentials 2.0 – Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior

The Road Warrior

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By John Smith

I feel a sense of joy when I hear that a filmmaker who was not born into the industry was able to churn out one of the most influential films of the past 50 years.  This man is George Miller who, after a successful career as a doctor, created the Mad Max trilogy. While the trilogy isn’t exactly perfect, it’s pretty safe to say that Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior is one of the closest things to action movie perfection that you can find. It also produced some of the most iconic villains to grace the genre of science fiction.

PFS Rapid Recommendations – The Dance of Reality

The-Dance-of-Reality-Poster-1000W

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Davis Rivera

In his latest triumph Alejandro Jodorowsky travels back to his native Chile to bring us the “imaginary autobiography” The Dance of Reality.  As the film went on and the subject matter became more tragic, I knew I was watching the work of a filmmaker who promises nothing but fulfills everything.  An artist so ambitious that he demands no less of himself than to strive for a little immortality, even if it takes twenty-three years to do so.

PFS About Town – The Fool’s Journey @ PhilaMOCA

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Davis Rivera 

Since Orson Welles first made his love of the Tarot known in the 1958 masterpiece Touch of Evil, there has been a calling to filmmakers everywhere to look to the cards and make something extraordinary.  Philadelphia filmmaker Hanna Hamilton has done just that with her latest work The Fool’s Journey, a visual experiment comprised of twenty-two short films devoted to the twenty-two cards of the Major Arcana.  I was able to interview Hamilton when her film screened at PhilaMOCA as part of their Tuesday Tune-Out, a weekly series that features local musicians performing live before introducing a film of their choice.

The Essentials 2.0 – Hard Boiled

Hard Boiled

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By John Smith

Action films may not be the most respected genre when it comes to film buffs. There are a lot of people that I know personally who believe that they exist solely for dumb, popcorn entertainment purposes. If that’s the case, how do you explain John Woo’s ultimate masterpiece, Hard Boiled? This film is iconic and funny, brutally stylistic and engagingly beautiful. It’s an action film that can also be considered a work of art.

PFS Rapid Review – Neighbors

Neighbors

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Ian Abell

Raunchy, loud, and consistently funny, Neighbors shows what happens when a young family trying to settle down meets with college kids looking to live it up. Rogen and Efron fight well against each other as rival neighbors, comically playing with their Pineapple Express and High School Musical pasts with the support of a solid cast across the board. If you want a steady stream of hilarious one-upmanship, Neighbors is a movie to catch.

And You Call Yourself a FIlm Buff?! – La Grande Illusion

the grand illusion

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Gary Kafer

As the aristocratic French Captain de Boeldieu (Pierre Fresnay) lies prostrate on his death bed, a gunshot wound in his stomach just off screen, he utters to his assassin, the German Rittmeister von Rauffenstein (Erich von Stroheim): “For a commoner, dying in a war is a tragedy. But for you and I, it’s a good way out.” And so goes ‘the grand illusion’ of Jean Renoir’s 1937 masterpiece, a war film that is curiously less about the hostilities of World War I, and perhaps more concerned with a shared humanism in the wake of an abrupt new world order.

And You Call Yourself a Film Buff?! – Full Metal Jacket

full metal jacket 1 (1)

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Gary Kafer

If war has become its own cinematic genre, then certainly Vietnam movies constitute a certain subgenre, populated with critically acclaimed works like Platoon, The Deer Hunter, and Apocalypse Now. An intricate piece of a tumultuous era in history, the Vietnam War has since occupied a precarious position in the collective memory of the American consciousness as an incredibly unpopular armed conflict rife with discontent both on the frontlines and the home front.

It is here that Stanley Kubrick inserts his controversial 1987 Full Metal Jacket – a piercing, violent, and unwavering depiction of the psychological and physical trauma experienced during the Vietnam War.