Posts Tagged ‘PFS Blog’

PFS Rapid Recommendations – The Dance of Reality

The-Dance-of-Reality-Poster-1000W

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Davis Rivera

In his latest triumph Alejandro Jodorowsky travels back to his native Chile to bring us the “imaginary autobiography” The Dance of Reality.  As the film went on and the subject matter became more tragic, I knew I was watching the work of a filmmaker who promises nothing but fulfills everything.  An artist so ambitious that he demands no less of himself than to strive for a little immortality, even if it takes twenty-three years to do so.

PFS About Town – The Fool’s Journey @ PhilaMOCA

TheFoolsJourney_2

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Davis Rivera 

Since Orson Welles first made his love of the Tarot known in the 1958 masterpiece Touch of Evil, there has been a calling to filmmakers everywhere to look to the cards and make something extraordinary.  Philadelphia filmmaker Hanna Hamilton has done just that with her latest work The Fool’s Journey, a visual experiment comprised of twenty-two short films devoted to the twenty-two cards of the Major Arcana.  I was able to interview Hamilton when her film screened at PhilaMOCA as part of their Tuesday Tune-Out, a weekly series that features local musicians performing live before introducing a film of their choice.

The Essentials 2.0 – Hard Boiled

Hard Boiled

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By John Smith

Action films may not be the most respected genre when it comes to film buffs. There are a lot of people that I know personally who believe that they exist solely for dumb, popcorn entertainment purposes. If that’s the case, how do you explain John Woo’s ultimate masterpiece, Hard Boiled? This film is iconic and funny, brutally stylistic and engagingly beautiful. It’s an action film that can also be considered a work of art.

PFS Rapid Review – Neighbors

Neighbors

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Ian Abell

Raunchy, loud, and consistently funny, Neighbors shows what happens when a young family trying to settle down meets with college kids looking to live it up. Rogen and Efron fight well against each other as rival neighbors, comically playing with their Pineapple Express and High School Musical pasts with the support of a solid cast across the board. If you want a steady stream of hilarious one-upmanship, Neighbors is a movie to catch.

And You Call Yourself a FIlm Buff?! – La Grande Illusion

the grand illusion

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Gary Kafer

As the aristocratic French Captain de Boeldieu (Pierre Fresnay) lies prostrate on his death bed, a gunshot wound in his stomach just off screen, he utters to his assassin, the German Rittmeister von Rauffenstein (Erich von Stroheim): “For a commoner, dying in a war is a tragedy. But for you and I, it’s a good way out.” And so goes ‘the grand illusion’ of Jean Renoir’s 1937 masterpiece, a war film that is curiously less about the hostilities of World War I, and perhaps more concerned with a shared humanism in the wake of an abrupt new world order.

And You Call Yourself a Film Buff?! – Full Metal Jacket

full metal jacket 1 (1)

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Gary Kafer

If war has become its own cinematic genre, then certainly Vietnam movies constitute a certain subgenre, populated with critically acclaimed works like Platoon, The Deer Hunter, and Apocalypse Now. An intricate piece of a tumultuous era in history, the Vietnam War has since occupied a precarious position in the collective memory of the American consciousness as an incredibly unpopular armed conflict rife with discontent both on the frontlines and the home front.

It is here that Stanley Kubrick inserts his controversial 1987 Full Metal Jacket – a piercing, violent, and unwavering depiction of the psychological and physical trauma experienced during the Vietnam War.

PFS Rapid Review – Under the Skin

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Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Davis Rivera

Jonathan Glazer has been called an heir to Kubrick, but the truth is that, over the course of three feature length films, a dozen music videos, and countless commercials, Glazer has repeatedly proven that he is a filmmaker who stands apart with his own idiosyncratic vision.  His latest work Under the Skin takes Michel Faber’s acclaimed 2000 novel and infuses it with a cinematic power capable of changing the way the viewer looks at the world.

PFS Rapid Review – Divergent

divergent poster

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Kim Scott

Divergent exhausts the tale of a teenaged girl with an aptitude for greatness in a post-apocalyptic future. The film is predictable and heavy-handed with its use of young adult novel tropes and a brooding love interest. Though the visuals entertain, the story stumbles on its way to unveiling the much too obvious secrets behind the factions and ‘divergents’. Another film about an oppressive city-state bent on wiping out young, beautiful rebels? Say it isn’t so! 

And You Call Yourself a Film Buff?! – Midnight Cowboy

Midnight Cowboy

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Keegan Handley

Midnight Cowboy is one of the first popular X-rated studio movies. Beyond that, it’s one of the first ‘adult films’ where the term applied to more than pornography. The term ‘adult’ as applied here actually means it dealt with serious adult situations. There’s a good deal of sex in here — specifically themes of homosexuality, sex and religion — but above all this film paints a beautiful character study of two unlikely friends trying to make their way in a mean city with no one to rely on but each other. But you can bet people ignored the movie simply because of the X rating.

I personally only remember one bit of Midnight Cowboy from my blossoming film buff days – “I’m walking here!”

PFS Rapid Review – Jodorowsky’s Dune

Jodorowsky's Dune

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Davis Rivera

Alejandro Jodorowsky is a man known for many things: Master of the Tarot, Director of El Topo, writer of what Mark Millar called ‘one of the most perfect comics ever conceived’ The Incal.  It is ironic that he is arguably most known for his never-filmed adaptation of Frank Herbert’s 1965 Dune.  Thoroughly researched and wonderfully faithful to the spirit of Jodo, Jodorowsky’s Dune shows us what could have been and serves as a perfect companion piece to Louis Mouchet’s seminal Constellation Jodorowsky.