Posts Tagged ‘PFS Roxy’

PFS Review – Mississippi Grind


Written by Media on . Posted in Blogs

By Don Malvasi

Originally posted on

See it at the Roxy! copyA couple of apparent losers get acquainted during a poker game in some godforsaken Iowa town. One, Gerry (a terrific Ben Mendelsohn), is a fascinating degenerate gambler who probably couldn’t stop if someone told him the world would end tomorrow if he didn’t. The other player, Curtis (an equally good Ryan Reynolds), is like-able although swaggering and outgoing to the point of badgering. He is also hard to figure out. Curtis gambles, too, although more on the people in his life, strangers included, than on actual games.

Pleasantly Plot-light and atmosphere-heavy through most of its 108 minutes, Mississippi Grind turns the tables and indulges in a flurry of dramatic twists in its final quarter. Most of them work but chiefly as exclamation points on an unnerving, intimate character study. As Curtis is quick to point out during the twosome’s road jaunt through St. Louis, Memphis, and New Orleans, it is the journey that counts not the destination.

PFS Review – Good Kill

Good Kill

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Don Malvasi

Originally posted on

Click here for the full Roxy listing and times.

Click image for the full Roxy listings and times.

Tommy Egan (Ethan Hawke) suffers from a new kind of culture shock. An F-16 military pilot with six Iraqi tours under his belt, he now finds himself inside a claustrophobic trailer that serves as a drone command center near Las Vegas. Major Egan, surrounded by newcomers recruited because they “were a bunch of gamers,” has also become an increasingly rare breed of specialist–one with actual combat experience. The triggerman for numerous drone strikes in Afghanistan and Yemen, he pines to get back in the cockpit of an jet airplane–a place where the fight is at least fair. In a plane he felt an oddly intoxicating fear. Here he feels revulsion and self-loathing.

Last Week on Tuesday – May 12th, 2015


Written by Trey Shields on . Posted in Blogs

Last week was completely packed with special events going on at the Philadelphia Film Society. I got to take (my first ever) business trip down to Baltimore for the Maryland Film Festival. I’ll be posting a recap and highlights from my time down there later this week. I’ll just say that MFF was a very powerful and extraordinary film festival that really displayed the importance and love of film in such a supportive community.

Last Week on Tuesday – April 28th

Written by Trey Shields on . Posted in Blogs

I’m happy to introduce another new blog section called “Last Week on Tuesday”. Every Tuesday I’ll fill you in on what happened the previous week at PFS,  all the blood, sweat, tears and sneak previews. Last week saw a number of screenings and events for PFS. From weeding a section of Fairmount Park to literally being in the weeds with a certain screening (jokes, jokes), we saw it all.

Now Showing at PFS – Week of April 27th


Written by Trey Shields on . Posted in Blogs, Uncategorized

Welcome and thank you for reading the first, of hopefully many installments, of Monday’s “Now Showing” blog post. This will be your guide for all things film/movie/experimental GIFs revolving around the Philadelphia Film Society and beyond. My goal is to not only sate your never ending thirst for irreverent click baiting blog posts, but inform you of all the exciting things happening in the coming week. Click here for a full list of this week’s showings.

…but let’s be honest, there is only one thing on peoples’ minds this week:

PFS Review – The Age of Adaline

Age of Adaline1

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs, Uncategorized

By Alex Gibson

The Age of Adaline opens with snow falling in San Francisco in the early 1900s, a momentous occasion considering the climate of the area, but also remarkable because of what happens to 29-year-old Adaline Bowman See it at the Roxy!just minutes later.

On her way to see her young daughter, Adaline skids off the road and from then on, never ages another day. Played exquisitely by Blake Lively, Adaline lives her life one the run decade after decade without aging a single day until the 2010s, when she meets Ellis Jones (Michiel Huisman), the first man to whom she’d consider revealing her secret.  The Age of Adaline co-stars Ellen Bursytn, who plays Adaline’s daughter Flemming, and Harrison Ford, the former love of her life, who catches up with her years later.  

PFS Review – American Sniper

American Sniper

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Don Malvasi

Originally Posted on

Far from an exercise in yahoo-ism, American Sniper offers us a film startlingly immediate in itsSee it at the Roxy! action scenes. Coming to be known as “The Legend,” Navy Seal Chris Kyle, its subject, went through four tours in the Iraq War, in which he performed around 160 official “kills” (and apparently another hundred unofficial ones). The film does an adequate if not equally proficient job of showing the tally all the warfare takes on his psyche. Like Kyle, director Clint Eastwood seems eager to get back to Iraq. In between the tours, domestic scenes with his wife (Sienna Miller) show an increasingly distant Kyle. More detail could have been presented but his emotional and mental deterioration come across nonetheless. Although Kyle approached his mission with an unwavering patriotism, Kyle viewed himself much differently than his peers viewed him.

PFS Review – #TBT Edition – Rich Hill

Rich Hill

Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Don Malvasi

Originally Posted on

As a chaser to Richard Linklater’s monumental Boyhood, take a peek at this Sundance award-winning documentary profiling three destitute white kids from rural Missouri. Their level of poverty and all-around impoverishment makes Linklater’s screen kid look like he’s part of the Trump family.

Three distinctively different kids emerge. One is all-get-out upbeat, another, mostly dour misanthropic; the third, an interesting mess of charismatic, vain, and simpleminded. They hook you.

PFS Review – Into the Woods


Written by Alex Gibson on . Posted in Blogs

By Don MalvasiSee it at the Roxy!

Originally Posted on

Rife with colorful characters and brimming with the signature rhyming banter of Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine, Into The Woods is the closest thing this Christmas season to a rewarding family film. Just don’t expect things to come with a ribbon wrapped around them. If the mashing of familiar Grimm fairy tales into a not-so-conventional tale sounds like your idea of good fun, you wouldn’t be far wrong. Although the Rob Marshall adaptation of the 1987 stage production loses some steam in its second half, it is a well-cast showcase for the likes of Meryl Streep, Anna Kendrick, Chris Pine, Johnny Depp (as the Big Bad Wolf), and especially the amusing Tracy Ullmann and the excellent Emily Blunt.